Olea oleaster

Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.
Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.Olea oleaster, Oleaceae , Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.
Botanical Nomenclature Olea oleaster
Common Name Wild Olive
Taxonomy- Family Oleaceae
Distinguishing Features of the Plant Olea oleaster is a perennial, spiny shrub growing up to 20m, with small, opposite, short-stemmed, oval leaves, green upside and silver-white underside. The fruits are small, black drupes, which produce oil of excellent quality. The flowering takes place in May, the fruiting happens from June to July and the harvesting takes place in early winter. The fruits ripen happens between October and November.
Region Found Epirus
Part of the Plant with Active Substances Fruits, leaves
Active Substances Resin, which contains benzoic acid, mannitol, essential oil, tripalmitin, triolein, arachidic esters, oleic acid, vitamins A, C, D.
Pharmacological Effects - Therapeutic Applications The plant has antipruritic, antiseptic, astringent, cholagogue, emollient, antipyretic, hypoglycaemic, laxative and sedative properties. It is used in the form of herbal tea for the treatment of peptic ulcer, as well to reduce blood sugar levels, and as sedative against nervous tension and hypertension (external application in the form an oil). It is applied externally to the skin against itching, bites, burns, abrasions, as well as hair tonic and antidandruff. In folk medicine of some countries the bark, from which is isolated a gum, is used as healing.
Method of Administration The plant is administered in the form of herbal tea (2 spoons of dried herb in 1L of boiled water, twice a day). It is applied externally to the skin as sedative in the form of oil (a few drops for external use). Finally, it is used as component in creams, ointments and shampoos (antidandruff).
Warning: The use of herb preparations is not recommended without seeking advice from your physician or pharmacist. The substances they contain may interact with the subscribed drugs that the patient already takes, thus eliminating their therapeutic efficacy or inducing toxicity. They may also burden further weakened vital functions of the body thus exposing the patient to increased morbidity and life threatened conditions.
Toxicity- Adverse Effects No side effects have been reported.
References 1)https://wiki.medicinalplants-uses.com/index.php?title=Olea_oleaster 2)http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/o/olive-06.html#con 3)http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Olea+europaea 4)http://ikee.lib.auth.gr/record/124301/files/Agriel.pdf 5)http://mde-didaktiki.biol.uoa.gr/mde8/gargeraki/ekti_selida.html